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Web fraud touches new high with ‘Interpol’ mail

DNJAI23698 | 4/11/2011 | Author : Rao Jaswant Singh | WC :397



An email in your inbox from Interpol saying that the international police organisation wants to transfer some cash in your bank account may take you by surprise. But, it catches your attention as soon as you read it further.
Drafted on an Interpol’s official letterhead, the fraud email informs the recipient that the agency has arrested some ‘fraudsters’ who had been involved in online lottery and financial scams. “During raids, we recovered some computers, laptops and other valuable information, which leads to contacting you,” the email reads.
The email further reads that the recipient, among several befooled in the past by the arrested culprits, will be paid certain amount of cash recovered from them.
By apparently collaborating with the World Bank no less, the agency declares it will return $1,50,000 to the recipient as part of their “frozen accounts funds”.
The paymaster’s office in Chesapeake Bay, California, US has been duly instructed to make payments forthwith, reads the fraud email bearing the name of Sydney Baroso, Interpol DC. All one has to do is furnish his personal and employment details.
As soon as the recipient sends a confirmation reply to the email saying that he has been receiving fraud emails, the ‘Interpol’ quickly reverts back with a pay order form and requests the victim to send the filled form within 24-hours to get the cash.
During the past few years, online fraudsters have been playing tricks in the name of Interpol and several cases have been registered with the police in which victims lost money after responding to such emails.
When asked about such fraud emails, a senior police officer said the police have been alerting people about such fraud emails and sharing their personal details.
He said the department has already issued an alert through its cyber crime cell requesting internet users to be alert about such online traps. “We will also try to bring it to the notice of Interpol authorities,” the officer added.
Phishing method
Drafted on an Interpol’s official letterhead, the fraud email informs the recipient that the agency has arrested some ‘fraudsters’ who had been involved in online lottery and financial scams
The email further reads that the recipient, among several befooled in the past by the arrested culprits, will be paid certain amount of cash recovered from them
By collaborating with the World Bank no less, the agency declares it will return $1,50,000 to recipient



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